Professional Effectiveness: Managing work pressures and stress

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Description:
One of the consequences of the current economic uncertainty can be increased work pressures because of scarcer resources. However it is possible to responding to the changing work environment by developing the necessary skills and techniques use them to improve the working life. When you develop your professional effectiveness, you will recognise that there are choices when reacting to situations and to the current climate. The workshop will illustrate how individual attitudes and habitual responses to events or behavior has a huge impact on the amount of stress and pressure generated. It will be very practically focused and will encourage discussion, participation and interaction from the group.
Prerequisites:
People who are feeling stressed or overwhelmed at work and would like to be more in control and respond differently to stressful situations. They also want to create more successful relationships at work.
Having completed this session the participants will :
Understand that we have a choice in how we respond to the inevitable stress of modern life
Recognise the positive effect of stress
Develop a strategy to respond to potentially stressful situations
Training Content :
Causes and consequences of stress
Positive and negative effects of stress
Using Fredrickson’s broaden and build theory to resist and neutralise stressful situations
The three stages of stress
Manage your stress:
Improving your stress tolerance level in the workplace
Avoid catching the stress bug from others
Recognising your triggers points and hot spots
Breaking the cycle of stress reactivity
Understanding the sources of your stress :
The internal causes of stress
Dealing with the external causes of stress
Responding to Stressful situations :
Dealing with irate customers or co-workers
Defensive Pessimism
Responding to Stressful People :
Recognising bullying behaviour
Dealing with negative feedback
Assertiveness techniques
Reporting unacceptable behaviour